9 Benefits of Preschool

 

Mine, mine!  Those words were etched into my brain at one point.  They’re the words of a toddler claiming everything that belongs to them, you, the neighbor and anyone else who has possessions that are visible. That was my grandson years ago. Sharing with other children was simply out of the question. We believed part of the problem was him being an only child and not having to share.  We knew that he would encounter problems if we didn’t expose him to other children and adults. 

Did you  know this? The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) shows that children who attend Preschool for at least 1 year have stronger reading, vocabulary, and math skills than those who don’t attend. We researched and checked out several schools in the area that we believed would benefit him the most and had stellar reputations.  Unfortunately they had waiting lists. Rather than sit around and twiddling our thumbs waiting for an opening, we decided on a Preschool and took advantage of their child care facility.  The facility would transition him to Preschool once there was an opening. 


Many parents don’t realize that there is a difference between Child Care and Preschool.  He’s 2 in the picture below, it’s his first day at Child Care. This is one of my favorite pictures of him. He was 3 when he entered Preschool. Prior to entering Preschool, he was weened from his Nip Nip and completely potty trained. 
To eliminate any confusion here are some differences between Child Care and Preschool:

  1. Child Care facilities will take children at a young age, some places as young as 3 months when mom returns to work. Preschools normally don’t take children before ages 2 or 3.  
  2. Child Care facilities will assist with potty training and weening from the pacifier. Preschools require children to be potty trained and off the pacifier. 
  3. Preschools normally have set hours and summers off like regular schools. 
  4. Child Care facilities focus on playing, napping, happy and healthy. Preschools focus on education. 
  5. Preschools have Parent and Teacher conferences as well as plays and recitals.
When we were making a decision as to whether we should place him in Preschool, we weighed the pros and cons. I honestly couldn’t find any cons, but I found plenty of benefits for Preschool:
  1. Your child will have an established bedtime and get into a routine of getting up in the morning at a specify time. 
  2. Your child will learn to play with other children and be exposed to a group experience.
  3. Your child will have an established nap/rest period during the day.
  4. Your child will learn how to share, compromise and respect other children.  
  5. Your child will learn to be independent and learn confidence. 
  6. Your child will understand the concept of homework. He will be given homework every evening to ensure he learns his shapes, colors, numbers, the alphabet etc.
  7. Your child will have experiences from field trips with his classmates.
  8. Your child will learn social skills and make new friends. 
  9. Your child will be better prepared for the next level of education, Kindergarten. 

Studies have shown that Early Childhood Development is the foundation for a strong education. I recommend that you create a list of what you’re looking for in a Preschool and do your homework. Check out several facilities and make comparisons on the pros and cons. Make sure the building or facility is up to code, clean, has a safe playground, and has a stellar rating for early childhood education. 


Xavier completed 2 years of Preschool, ages 3-4, and excelled when he entered Kindergarten. He is now in the second grade and is an excellent student with strong academic skills. What’s your thoughts on Preschool?