4 Benefits of Reading to Children

 

reading to children

 

Reading to children during bedtime has been a staple part of growing up. However, the activity goes beyond being a means to strengthen the ties between parent and child.  Additionally, science has proven that kids can gain a lot of benefits from the activity.

It helps them develop their vocabulary

One of the most obvious benefits of reading to children is that it helps them learn new words. According to G. Reid Lyon, at the National Institute of Child Health and Development,
reading can increase brain activity.  Specifically, it stimulates the auditory cortex, which is the part of the brain that handles language sounds. The more they become exposed to words, the quicker it will take them to process and learn them.

It helps stimulate their imagination

You might find it hard to believe that imagination can actually be measured by science, but that is exactly what a medical team from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center did.
An article on WebMD summarized the results of their research
, which revealed that reading to children helps stimulate brain activity.

The study revealed that the more time children were exposed to reading at home, the more they showed brain activity while listening to stories at the laboratory. Dr. John Hutton, who led the team, stated that this was an indication that reading to children can help fire up their imagination.  Scientists believe that early reading can help develop children’s literacy later on in life. 

 

benefits of reading to children

 

It helps advance their skills

In 2013,
the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research discovered that children aged 4-5 years old who read 3-5 times a week have the same reading skills of kids who are older than them by 6 months.  The older children read less than twice a week.  Furthermore, the study discovered that reading to kids 6-7 times weekly can help them become on par with those who are nearly a year older than them.

These promising results go beyond the laboratory.  The author and illustrator Nadia Shireen, who, in an interview with Tootsa, revealed that as a child, she went to the library regularly. As a result, it inspired her to pursue her profession.

Reading does not just improve children’s adeptness to words. It can even improve their mathematical skills. An article on The Guardian discussed how this could be due to the fact that reading makes kids more receptive to new ideas, enabling them to pick up skills, including involving numbers, much faster.

It teaches them coping skills

Reading can also help children learn coping skills.  Books can help children learn how to better handle difficult situations.  Additionally, books serve as a temporary escape that they can turn to in times of stress.

 

Written exclusively  for Mother2mother Blog
by So Mom, JB!

 

24 Winter Books for Kids

kids winter books winter books for kids winter books for kids

 

Because winter can keep kids indoors for days, even weeks they become bored.  Not only do they become bored, parents can find it challenging to keep them occupied. However, we have a solution.  Create a small library with winter books for kids.  Fortunately, reading is a passion in my family, and I highly recommend that you encourage your children to read too.  Create a cozy corner, desk or hide away for them to snuggle up with a book and enjoy a delicious snack while they’re at it.  We have a few winter book for kids suggestions that you should check out:

The Biggest Snowman Ever – First, Clayton and Desmond enter a contest to build a snowman.  Their efforts just don’t seem to be working.  So, they join forces to build the biggest snowman ever.  Hurray for team work. Ages 4 – 8.

The Mitten –  Nikki drops his white mitten in the snow, but doesn’t realize it.  It’s hard for him to find because of the white snow.  As a result, the woodland animals help him search for it.  Ages 1 – 3.

Tracks in the Snow – A little girl sees tracks outside her window.  She decides to follow the tracks only to realize that the tracks are hers from the day before.

All You Need for a Snowman – The children of this snow-clad chalet village build two huge snowmen.  Ages 4 – 7.

The Gingerbread Girl – This gingerbread girl has licorice hair, and an awesome plan to outsmart the fox.  Ages 2 – 5.

Groundhog Day! – Every February 2, people wonder if the groundhog will see its shadow.  In addition, this book contains information about the groundhog and the origin of Groundhog Day.  Ages 6 – 9.

Ollie’s Ski Trip – Ollie is given his first pair of real skis, and sets off on an adventure.  He meets lots interesting people including Ms. Thaw.  Ages 3 – 6.

Sneezy the Snowman –  Sneezy the Snowman is cold.  He decided to warm up by drinking some cocoa, sits in a hot tub, stands near a fire and than melts. But children decide to build him back up.  Ages 6 – 8.

Snow Day! – The weatherman depicts snow.  Snuggling on the sofa with hot chocolate, building a snow fort, snowballs and sledding are in the future. Ages 5 – 8.

Snowballs – Check out all of the objects that can be used to decorate snowmen.  The book is beautifully illustrated.  Ages 3 – 8.

The Snow Globe Family – Additionally, there’s a snow globe on the mantel in a family’s home.  Inside the snow globe is a family waiting for someone to shake the globe so there will be a blizzard.  Will a family member shake the globe? Who will it be?  Ages 6 – 8.

Snowman’s Story – A bunny rabbit steals a snowman’s story book when he falls asleep.  The snowman wants his book back.  Get ready for a chase!   Ages 3 – 7.

Snowmen at Night  – Have you wondered what snowmen do at night?  They may loose buttons, an arm or their carrot nose, but nobody knows how.  Find out about the secret life of snowmen in this exciting book. Ages 4 – 7.

Snowmen at Play – This activity book is filled with snowmen, stickers and lots of fun.  Ages 3 – 5.

Tacky the Penguin – Tacky’s behavior annoys his friends.  They are prime and proper, however, Tacky is not.  But  his strange behavior saves the day.  Thereafter, they see him differently.  Ages 4 – 7.

Akiak – Akiak is the lead dog on a team of Huskies.  As usual, she head ups the team.  But she hurts her paw and has to be removed from the race.  Fortunately, Akiak doesn’t know that she’s been disqualified.  Although she has been disqualified, she continues to run beside her team.  Ages 5 – 8.

Winter Wonderland – Bear Country (Berenstein Bears) becomes a winter wonderland.  Ages 4 – 7.

Eloise Skates! – Eloise’s nanny decides to take her and Weenie ice-skating! Weenie is a dog.  But can dogs ice-skate?  Ages 6 – 8.

The First Day of Winter – In another story, the first ten days of winter bring special gifts for a special friend.  I wonder what they are?  Ages 3 – 6.

It’s Snowing! –  This book is great for our science lovers.  It discusses snowflakes how they are formed, different regions and they snow received, and how to prepare for a snow storm.  Ages 6 – 9.

Lemonade in the Winter – Pauline and her little brother, John-John, decide to open a lemonade stand in the winter.  It’s unusual, so will they be able to sell their cold drink?  Ages 3 – 7.

The Little Polar Bear – Next, Lars goes hunting with his father, but he is so tired from the day’s activities he falls asleep. As a result, he doesn’t hear the ice crack.  Unfortunately, he drifts away from his father and the North Pole.  Will he be able to find his way back?

The Little Rippers – Max and Molly Beckett are brother and sister.  As usual, they are looking forward to their annual ski weekend with their grandfather on Powderhound Mountain.  Ages 4 – 7.

Olivia Builds a Snowlady  – Last, Olivia and her classmates have been assigned to build the best snowman for the town’s Winter Festival.  They decided to build a snowlady instead of a snowman.

We hope that you found our list of winter books for kids helpful. Most noteworthy, at least to me was Olivia Builds a Snowlady. My granddaughter loves Olivia, so that book will definitely go into her library.  I’m also thinking about the Gingerbread Girl.  Which ones peeked you curiosity?

Additionally, you may also like 22 Winter Crafts for Kids and 30+ Rich and Delicious Hot Chocolate Recipes.

 

5 Benefits of the Library

 

benefits of the library

 

Do you go to your local library or attend information sessions? Going to story hour at the library was a major event when I was growing up and raising my daughter.  I don’t hear much about story hour at the library from parents anymore. Did you know that there

I have wonderful memories of spending time at the library during the summer when I was growing up.  We spent time having stories read to us, checking out books, and becoming responsible by returning them on time.  We have moved into a technological world, and it seems that most books are downloaded these days.  As a result, taking kids to the library has become a lost art.

I must admit I like the convenience of being able to download books in the comfort of my home, but also like knowing that the children and I are still picking up a good old fashion book at times.  I started a home library for both Xavier and Zarriah.

We added shelves in Zarriah’s room to house her books and Xavier has a book case. Zarriah loves for me to read to her. I think all children should experience visiting a library.  Knowledge is power, and we must empower our children.

I have decided to have the children attend a few activities at our local library.  I have subscribed to our library’s newsletter so I can keep up with activities that will be offered this summer.  Our local library offers activities during the day and evenings. I’m thinking this will be a constructive and educational means of occupying some of their time rather than play video games.  A few other benefits of visiting the library:

  1. Teaches consideration for others – Children will learn to keep their voices down.
  2. Provides an opportunity to see others reading – Children need examples, seeing others read will encourage them to read as well.  
  3. Story Hour provides an opportunity for group interaction – Children will learn to sit in a group and participate in a group activity.
  4. Teaches listening skills – Listening to the person who is reading will enhance your child’s listening skills. 
  5. Enhances social skills – Becoming involved in activities at the library will help children learn or enhance skills.  Participating in story hour provides an opportunity to meet other children that they may not encounter in their neighborhood or school.  

One program in particular caught my eye, science.  They plan to hatch eggs, perform experiments and have the children build structures.  I have also found events that will be beneficial to me.  For example, I will be attending a session on Traveling Abroad On A Budget.  I hope to start traveling internationally within the next year.

Make a trip to the library and get your children involved in their activities.

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