How To Delegate Appropriate Chores for Kids

 

chores for kids

Please note that the title of this blog does not ask if children should do chores. As members of a family unit, of course, they should contribute. We’re going to tell you how to choose appropriate chores for kids of various age groups.

Preventing Pitfalls

Perfection is an unattainable goal. So, don’t expect it. Instead, take a more casual approach to chores and the way your kids accomplish them. As long as they make an honest effort, don’t discourage them by nitpicking the job they do, as per parenting pros at WebMD.

Next, don’t put off assigning chores to the kids who live in your house. If any child is earning an allowance, they are old enough to manage at least a few simple household errands.  For example, little kids can put their toys away and place their worn clothing into the hamper.  Elementary school age kids can scoop the litter box and feed the dog.

Most parents use an allowance as a tool for their children to learn money management.  Kids do well when they’re taught the value of a job well done too.   So, don’t always rely on money as proof of their contribution.  An allowance as compensation for chores rarely works on young kids who are not money motivated.

However, lavish praise and be consistent.  Express your happiness while your kid is actually doing the chore. This builds positive momentum and keeps your kid in action. Let your children know that you notice their efforts, and be sure to tell them they’re doing a good job, suggest Mom magazine.

Be Specific

Instead of telling your child to go clean your room, tell the exactly what you want them to do.  For example, put your dirty clothes in the hamper, put away your books and toys, or place your toys in the toy box,” is a much better way to give your kid the message. These are appropriate chores for kids that are young too.  Teach them how to make a bed before telling them to make it. Show them how to do the dishes before sending them into the kitchen to clean up. Make a chore chart and don’t micromanage. You want your kids to learn the joy of a job well done. Teach them to do it right, and let them get on with it.

Assign age appropriate chores

There’s no point in telling your toddler to wash the family car or take out the trash. You can, however, kindly instruct a teenager to do the same. Adolescents are able to manage most household chores sans supervision. They may not smile throughout the process, but they’re certainly capable of doing more chores than their younger siblings.

Teens who are newly licensed to drive may actually enjoy chores like using the family car to pick up needed items at the grocery store. Assign the chore of picking up their little sister at dance class, and you may even find your teen asking for more chores, suggests Mom magazine.

Make Chores Fun For Everyone

When you tell your kid to clean the bathroom, provide them with eco-friendly, nice smelling, biodegradable products. If they are not choked by fumes, they may welcome cleaning the tub and toilet. Stock up on a sweet selection of planet pleasing cleaning items from CleanHappens.com.  Make sure these are appropriate chores for kids who will be responsible with the products.

From the age of five until they reach adolescence, most kids are able to contribute time and energy to household chores. For a third or fourth grader, assign daily chores such as making their own bed, unloading the dishwasher, and feeding the family pet.  Other appropriate chores for kids this age may include things like folding and putting away laundry, emptying trash cans and sweeping the kitchen floor.

Seasonal Chore Charts

If your family lives where leaves turn orange in autumn and spring brings April showers, you can assign seasonal chores to your kids. In the summertime, kids can wash and vacuum the car. In winter, they can shovel sidewalks, suggests VeryWell magazine.

Most importantly, show them how you want the job done and always enforce safety rules.  Aside from that, tell your kid what to do and let them do it.  Avoid nagging your teen. Offer kind and encouraging guidance, instead.

Finally, insist that your teen do their chores before they go out with friends.  Setting priorities is a good way for them to learn management skills too.

About the Author: Jack Gould is a hands-on Dad who is proud to call himself a house husband. His articles talk about parenting, raising strong, independent, healthy and happy kids.

6 Free Chore Charts for Children

 

parenting, parenting tips

 

Do you give your children chores?  First, I have found that many of our children today have become entitled. They think that they shouldn’t have to work for anything.  Somehow the world owes them.  They make no effort in school, and most importantly they have no respect for their parents or anyone else.  Attitude is everything.

Furthermore, children should learn that there are no entitlements.  They must work for they what they want in life. Children need to understand that mom is not a maid or their personal chef.  Putting a roof over their head and food on the table is the result of work.  Just as important, many children grow up not knowing how to care for themselves or how to do things around the house.  They think it’s okay to depend on someone else to take care of them for their entire life.

Each of us should strive to become independent.  Furthermore, we should each strive to make contributions in the world.  Raising responsible children is a must for parents.  It all starts at home.  That thought process still continues in my home.  It applies to my grandchildren today.  Equally important, work ethics should be instilled early.  There are many benefits to children being given chores.  We suggest that you use our children’s chore charts below to track and reward their progress.  Here are a few benefits for giving children chores:

  • Responsibility – So, teaching children to take care of the home and themselves should be taught early. This includes their room and their hygiene.
  • The Importance of Completing A Task Next, children need to learn how to start a task and take it to completion.  They will learn endurance, perseverance, and to do things over again if it’s not satisfactory.  Using chore charts is a good way to help them remember and organize.
  • Team Work Chores will teach children about working as a member of a team in the home. Seeing that each has a part will help them see how each contributes. It will demonstrate that each team member contributes to the success of a family and relationship.
  • Self Sufficiency Children need to learn how to sustain themselves when possible.  Getting a drink from the refrigerator can teach self sufficiency.  Putting on their clothes, shoes etc. are good places to start.
  • How to Clean and Organize Giving children the responsibility of helping with dishes, meals and cleanup teaches this lesson.  It will give them a sense of keeping things tidy, and the satisfaction of keeping order.
  •  The Importance of Money Children need to learn that things in the home cost money.  This includes recreational items, clothes, games, toys etc.  Allowing them to do chores to earn money is a great way to help with this lesson. Teach them to save for something they want.  Allow them to experience the excitement of reaching their goals.
  • How to Save Money Giving an allowance for assisting around the house is a great way to teach children to save money for something they would like to have or do down the road. 
  • Receiving and Giving Rewards Children will learn that receiving and giving rewards boosts confidence and self-esteem.   

chore chart printablesNext,  download our children’s chore charts shown above here.  Children’s chore charts are a great way to help your children remember and complete their daily chores.  Use gold stars as a reward.  Place the gold stars on the days chores were completed.  Most importantly, praise your children generously.  Praise can be more of an award than the gold stars and money.