How To Delegate Appropriate Chores for Kids

 

chores for kids

Please note that the title of this blog does not ask if children should do chores. As members of a family unit, of course, they should contribute. We’re going to tell you how to choose appropriate chores for kids of various age groups.

Preventing Pitfalls

Perfection is an unattainable goal. So, don’t expect it. Instead, take a more casual approach to chores and the way your kids accomplish them. As long as they make an honest effort, don’t discourage them by nitpicking the job they do, as per parenting pros at WebMD.

Next, don’t put off assigning chores to the kids who live in your house. If any child is earning an allowance, they are old enough to manage at least a few simple household errands.  For example, little kids can put their toys away and place their worn clothing into the hamper.  Elementary school age kids can scoop the litter box and feed the dog.

Most parents use an allowance as a tool for their children to learn money management.  Kids do well when they’re taught the value of a job well done too.   So, don’t always rely on money as proof of their contribution.  An allowance as compensation for chores rarely works on young kids who are not money motivated.

However, lavish praise and be consistent.  Express your happiness while your kid is actually doing the chore. This builds positive momentum and keeps your kid in action. Let your children know that you notice their efforts, and be sure to tell them they’re doing a good job, suggest Mom magazine.

Be Specific

Instead of telling your child to go clean your room, tell the exactly what you want them to do.  For example, put your dirty clothes in the hamper, put away your books and toys, or place your toys in the toy box,” is a much better way to give your kid the message. These are appropriate chores for kids that are young too.  Teach them how to make a bed before telling them to make it. Show them how to do the dishes before sending them into the kitchen to clean up. Make a chore chart and don’t micromanage. You want your kids to learn the joy of a job well done. Teach them to do it right, and let them get on with it.

Assign age appropriate chores

There’s no point in telling your toddler to wash the family car or take out the trash. You can, however, kindly instruct a teenager to do the same. Adolescents are able to manage most household chores sans supervision. They may not smile throughout the process, but they’re certainly capable of doing more chores than their younger siblings.

Teens who are newly licensed to drive may actually enjoy chores like using the family car to pick up needed items at the grocery store. Assign the chore of picking up their little sister at dance class, and you may even find your teen asking for more chores, suggests Mom magazine.

Make Chores Fun For Everyone

When you tell your kid to clean the bathroom, provide them with eco-friendly, nice smelling, biodegradable products. If they are not choked by fumes, they may welcome cleaning the tub and toilet. Stock up on a sweet selection of planet pleasing cleaning items from CleanHappens.com.  Make sure these are appropriate chores for kids who will be responsible with the products.

From the age of five until they reach adolescence, most kids are able to contribute time and energy to household chores. For a third or fourth grader, assign daily chores such as making their own bed, unloading the dishwasher, and feeding the family pet.  Other appropriate chores for kids this age may include things like folding and putting away laundry, emptying trash cans and sweeping the kitchen floor.

Seasonal Chore Charts

If your family lives where leaves turn orange in autumn and spring brings April showers, you can assign seasonal chores to your kids. In the summertime, kids can wash and vacuum the car. In winter, they can shovel sidewalks, suggests VeryWell magazine.

Most importantly, show them how you want the job done and always enforce safety rules.  Aside from that, tell your kid what to do and let them do it.  Avoid nagging your teen. Offer kind and encouraging guidance, instead.

Finally, insist that your teen do their chores before they go out with friends.  Setting priorities is a good way for them to learn management skills too.

About the Author: Jack Gould is a hands-on Dad who is proud to call himself a house husband. His articles talk about parenting, raising strong, independent, healthy and happy kids.

Child Safety Tips All Parents Should Implement

 

child safety tips

 

Especially for first-time parents, there are a lot of fears and worries that can arise both during pregnancy and when your baby is born. But, it’s important to remember that a baby is an amazing and rewarding experience.  Don’t allow quality time with your child to be tainted by panic.

However, there are many parental safety tips many either ignore or aren’t aware about. And it’s these tips that could possibly eliminate your worry or anxiety. Here are a few sensible safety tips you should implement:

Cover all electrical outlets

 Electrical outlets are solely for appliances, but to the curious eyes of a toddler they are just another thing to touch and explore.  Installed at easy-to-reach heights for most children, electrical outlets are often appealing.  Therefore, it gives them easy access to stick things into the openings.  In some cases, causing serious electrical burns.

Therefore, cover all electrical outlets throughout your home.  Outlet caps are widely available both in stores or online.  Using electrical covers will help safeguard against electrical harm.

Use the correct car seat and install it properly

With the huge range of car seats available, it can be difficult to make a decision on which one is right for you. The most important rule regarding any car seat is when to use a rear-facing or front facing seat.  It’s important to remember, to use a rear-facing seat until your baby is at least one year old and weights over 20 pounds.

In terms of installation, make sure all seat belts and straps are routed correctly.  Most importantly, make sure everything is in ‘lock mode’ when your child is seated and before you start driving. If you have a large family-friendly vehicle like the Dodge Grand Caravan, your installation experience will be much easier.  You’ll have more space and room to move around.

Make sure your crib is up-to-date 

Crib safety regulations change very frequently.  It’s likely it will need to be upgraded if it’s over 5 years old.

Today’s current standards state that the slats of a crib should be no wider than 2 3/8 inches apart to ensure your child’s body can’t slip through. It’s also important to remove any fluffy blankets or toys from the crib when your baby is in there.

It’s natural to experience fear and worry when you become a parent. But if you adhere to the above safety tips and ensure your child’s bed is as up-to-date as possible and assembled correctly, you’ll have no reason to question your baby’s safety!

Teaching Children Responsibility

tips to teach children responsibility

 

Teaching children responsibility starts at an early age and it starts at home.  A child learning to be responsible will will increase their chances of being successful.  Learning responsibility started at an early age in my house.  We had conversations on why it was important and demonstrated negative results when being responsible wasn’t taken seriously.  Here are 5 ways that I used to install responsibility:

Assigning Chores This includes putting toys away, helping with dishes, cleaning their room and eventually getting a job around the age of 16 for the summer.  Yep my daughter had a job. Did she need to work, no.  I could financially support us, but it was a great way for her to learn about what it takes to hold down a job and build confidence. Getting to bed timely, getting up timely and reporting on time is a life long lesson.  Additionally, these skills need to be learned and embraced. Doing chores also included going to school and doing home work. In my home you  either go to school or get a job.

Playing Team Sports/Activities I put my daughter in organized activities at the age of 3. It was a little majorette group with drummers, so cute. At the age of 5, we switched to ballet. Ballet dancing requires discipline, and so does being successful in life. Organized sports or activities can include football, soccer, basketball, cheerleading, volleyball, whatever your child likes.  If your child is not into sports, try a painting or karate class. The important thing is that they learn about discipline and being a team player.

Volunteer Work – Doing volunteer work is a good way to learn about responsibility. Feeding the homeless, working at a food bank, reading to seniors at a nursing home is a good start. If they like farming, horses or gardening, have them volunteer on a farm or equestrian center.

Serving As A Role ModelBeing a role model can be rewarding. Children learn about leadership, and the importance of setting an example so others will want to follow their lead. Being a tutor, mentor, active in the church etc. makes a great community role model.

Having A Role ModelBeing your child’s role model is just as important as teaching them to be a role model. Children look at everything we do. We just think they aren’t listening.  Furthermore, it’s important that your child see you doing the things that you wan them to do.  For example, reading, taking courses on-line or at your local university, cleaning, cooking, handling money wisely, and most importantly spending time with them. It’s important that boys have a positive male as a role model and girls have a positive female as a role model.

Finally, how do you teach your children responsibility?  Do you use the same techniques for your sons and daughters?  We would love to add your tips to our list.  As we know, what works for one doesn’t necessarily work for the other. 

 chore charts for girls football-chore-chart-1 super-heroes-chore-chart-1

Finally, motivate your child with our chore charts.  We have ballerina, football, basketball, a princess, princess castle and superman.  You can download the charts here.  Print them and lets start getting those room cleans, toys put away and everything else on their lists.  Check back, I will be adding other charts.